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Admitting Mistakes

Admitting Mistakes. One of the hardest things for anyone to do is admitting that they made a mistake and are wrong. Why? Because admitting you made a mistake may be seen as a sign of weakness, that you are fallible, and don’t have all the answers.


Admitting you are wrong also requires you to learn and grow, which takes a lot of work and sometimes it’s not work we want to take on at the moment. It also requires strong emotional intelligence and vulnerability, it requires change, it may even require you to change your beliefs.


Changing your stance and what you believe about something is very hard to do. Our beliefs about leadership, relationships, communication, how we treat each other, and how we want to be treated usually come about from how were raised, the culture we experienced, and some of our earliest relationships we formed.


I recently made a mistake as it related to training for our team as I slowed played the schedule, thinking it wasn’t something we needed to prioritize at the time. Fast forward 60 days and now I’ve put the team in a tough situation, where they need to gain 90+ days of knowledge in less than 30 days. I made the wrong decision, I should have had them take the training months ago, even if it turned out to be a waste of their time, which I was trying to protect.


At the end of the day, it’s ok to admit that we are wrong, that we don’t’ have all the answers, that we are vulnerable, that we are human. Don’t be so stubborn to admit mistakes, learn and grow from them as we ask others to do the same. #mistakes #eq #vulnerable #emotionalintelligence #leadership #psychologicalsafety

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